Monthly Archives: December, 2012

Santa’s Sack!

Image

The Next Big Thing: an online interview with yourself.
(How romantic!)

The effervescent Lizzie Violet tagged me in a blog experiment called The Next Best Thing in which writers answer ten questions about a current project and post them on their blog, tagging other writers who would have interest in doing the same.  It started as a bookwriters exercise and Lizzie added the playwright angle.  Now I add the songwriters angle!!!!

Ten Interview Questions for The Next Big Thing:

(Songwriters version by Kat Leonard)

What is the working title of your song?
 Santa’s Sack

Where did the idea come from for the song? 
During a Christmas song brainstorming session with Heather Hill, Aynsley Saxe and Steve Didynuk.

What genre does it fall under?
 Novelty/comedy

Which performer (if not yourself) would you like to perform the song? 
Will Ferrell

What is the one-sentence synopsis of what the song is about?
Wanting to help Santa unload his heavy sack by taking your gifts now.

Will your song be self-published or represented by a separate music publisher?
Self-published.

Will it be part of an album or EP?  Possibly a festive collection.

How long did it take you to write the first draft? 6 hours

What other music genres/artists would you compare this song to?
Weird Al Yankovic, Bob Rivers, Jack Black & Tenacious D.

Who or what inspired you to write the song?
 Santa’s huge sack and jingle bells.

What about your song might pique the listeners interest?
The singalongability of “Ho ho ho ho ho ho ho” and the triple entendres.

Bonus: A sample!  Here is a smidge of my performing Santa’s Sack at the Music Mentor Productions holiday party this month: http://youtu.be/DJMudNqYdiU

And there are the lyrics:

SANTA’S SACK
by Kat Leonard November 2012

(Spoken) Dear Santa…
You’ve got a big sack– jam-packed
With heavy gifts of joy that could break your back
I can help you… damn straight
I can help release the pressure and reduce the weight

I’ll take my gifts now… and how
You know what I like and I’m willing to be wowed
I’ve been a good girl—giddy up
I saved half of your cookies and egg nog in a cup

Chorus:
Santa, how your sack does bulge
Ho ho ho ho ho ho ho
Bursting with the gifts I love
Ho ho ho ho ho ho ho
What could be inside for me?
Ho ho ho ho ho ho ho
Ho ho ho ho ho ho ho
Bulging sack of festive glee

You’ve got a big sack—paddywack!
The strain must be a constant risk of heart attack
Let me hold it– pick it up
I’ll keep it upright and inspect it close-up
You can trust me—fingers crossed
I’ll handle it with care so nothing gets tossed
Let me touch it—Jingle bells
I see something for me right there where it swells

BRIDGE:
Jolly yuletide clown
Come on down
Loosen your belt, recline by the fire
I’ll roast some nuts and sing like a choir
I’ve been a good girl
I saved you a cookie
I’ve been a good girl
(Spoken): Well, half a cookie.
It’s better than no cookie.
I’ve been waiting a long time, Santa.
They kept getting into my mouth… I couldn’t stop them.

(Repeat chorus and improvise to end)

I do hope you’ve enjoyed Santa’s Sack and benefit it from the real sack this holiday season!  Happy Ho Ho Ho!  I do believe Heather Hill and Arlene Paculan might be interested in doing The Next Big Thing exercise.  If anyone else is, please feel free to use my adapted questions!

Love Kat

www.KatLeonard.com

Knowledge is Power!

She's Listening!

She’s Listening!

OVARIAN CANCER – The Little-Known Killer of Women!

We the Four Winds Collective (independent artists Kat Leonard, Arlene Paculan, Meghan Morrison and Heather Hill) played a fundraising event for Ovarian Cancer Canada last Friday night with local artist Kelly Sloan at Bass Line Station in Ottawa, Ontario. Mike Anderson of CanadaParties.ca organized the event.  As the Winds traveled the 401 east, we discussed our issues with supporting certain types of charity fundraising events. We agreed that we are not as interested in supporting organizations that are backed by pharmaceutical companies as much as we want to support the charities that are lean, agile and creative and not backed by organizations that serve to benefit from the illness and its treatments.

Upon arrival at Bass Line Station we met Lynn Griffiths, who has been an active volunteer for Ovarian Cancer Canada since losing her dear sister Ann to the disease in 2007.   The Four Winds were pleased to learn that Ovarian Cancer Canada is not backed by pharmaceuticals and relies heavily on volunteers and donations to help raise awareness and funds for research.  Lynn had all kinds of literature for us and she shared some incredible information.

When Corinne Boyer succumbed to ovarian cancer in 1997 at the age of 57 years old, she left an enduring legacy.  Corinne’s husband, Patrick Boyer, created the Corinne Boyer Fund to advance ovarian cancer research and awareness.  In 1999 the name was changed to National Ovarian Cancer Association (NOCA). In 2002 the name was changed to Ovarian Cancer Canada, and it remains a member-based and funded organization. There is a research chair at the University of Ottawa as well as one that was added recently in Toronto.

Every year, 2600 Canadian women are diagnosed and 1750 women succumb to ovarian cancer.  What is most difficult is that there is no test to screen for whether you have ovarian cancer, and the symptoms are incredibly generic and subtle and very easily missed. And ovarian cancer must be treated early to increase the chances of successful healing.  Lynn mentioned that one of the risk factors is ovulation, that the more you ovulate the greater the risk of ovarian cancer.  So women who have not given birth and are not on the birth control pill could be at greater risk for developing ovarian cancer.

For more information, please visit www.ovariancanada.org.

What every woman NEEDS TO KNOW – or tell a woman you love!

▪   There is a lifetime risk of 1 in 70 that you will develop ovarian cancer

▪   Many doctors are unfamiliar with the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer and fail to consider it as a possible diagnosis

▪   Failure to find the disease in its early stages is partly due to (i) lack of sensitive detection tests and (ii) health care providers and even women themselves may ignore warning symptoms

▪   A Pap smear does not detect ovarian cancer

▪   HPV vaccine helps prevent cervical cancer, not ovarian cancer

▪    Recent research has found that a large proportion of ovarian cancers actually start in the fallopian tubes rather than the ovaries. If you are having gynecologic surgery, ask your doctor whether or not removal of the fallopian tubes would be beneficial to you. For more information, visit ovcare.ca

▪   Pain in the abdomen is not necessarily a symptom of ovarian cancer – even if you have no pain, your doctor cannot rule out ovarian cancer

▪  Even though ovarian cancer is known as the “disease that whispers” the majority of women with ovarian cancer report symptoms, including women diagnosed at an early stage

▪   Ovarian cancer rates rise after menopause, peaking from age 60-75, although it can occur at any age

▪   The hereditary form, found in families where many close relatives have had breast and/or ovarian cancer, tends to occur at an earlier age

The Four Winds enjoyed a warm night of music and amusement with Lynn and the staff of Bass Line Station as well as friends and audience who came out to join us.  We were thrilled to learn that many of the audience members donated very generously to Ovarian Cancer Canada and we were happy to donate proceeds of CD sales to the important cause.

Please do inform yourself about ovarian cancer and its symptoms as well as other insidious diseases, and please share information with your friends and loved ones.  As the Ovarian Cancer Canada tagline states: Knowledge is Power.

Four Winds with Mike Anderson and Lynn Griffiths

And now, for your listening pleasure, please enjoy two of the Winds’ cancer-inspired tunes: How Long by Heather Hill and Fuck Cancer by Kat Leonard.

Be well and be informed.

Love, Heather and Kat
(Two of the Four Winds Collective)